Time to fight overseas threats

Why entertain the idea of subjecting beef producers to an authority which is not their government?

AS Australians prepare to pause in remembrance of the sacrifice of this nation's fighting men and women in war, it is salient to be reminded of the challenges this country still faces in maintaining control over its own affairs and destiny.

Threats to Australia's interests need not come out of a gun. Plans to undermine our country's common wealth and individual prosperity via attacks on our food security can just as easily be made in overseas boardrooms by operatives in suits representing multinational corporations and non-government organisations (NGOs) aided and abetted by traitors within our own borders.

Such a scenario is playing out now with the WWF-created Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (GRSB), whose members met in Brisbane on April 16.

Queensland Country Life has reported on the dangers this group and its WWF-inspired ideas pose for Australia's beef industry and farming interests in general for nearly three years.

There is more detail in this week's edition and the fight is far from over. The one consideration that our beef producers should perhaps ask themselves about the GRSB is: Why is Cattle Council and the Fitzroy Basin Association, representing beef producers from a First World, democratic country, with an excellent reputation in science and land management and animal husbandry, entertaining the idea of subjecting those same producers to an authority which is not their government?

Make no mistake, WWF does not intend producers to have any control over this program. That is the way the program is designed.

WWF operatives sat in a distant continent and planned how it would control the supply chains of 15 or so commodities globally and came up with their Market Transformation Initiative, of which GRSB is just a tiny part.

The grand plan calls for third party certification. The Market Transformation Initiative recognises that 6 billion consumers and 1.5 billion producers worldwide is an unwieldy group to wrestle with, but the top 100 companies which supply these consumers is a much easier target.

It is a cynical exercise in exposing each company's environmental weak point in the court of public opinion and exploiting it with a cunning ruthlessness that would have made the fascists of pre-Word War II Europe proud.

There is no intention to give consumers, producers or anyone else in the supply chain any choice. WWF is not famous for its democracy.

Do we have a legitimate sovereign government or not? It is time our Agriculture Minister in Canberra, Barnaby Joyce, made his voice heard on this issue and made it clear, like Senator Ron Boswell has done, that the battle lines are definitive and unequivocal, and no quarter will be given to these green aggressors.

In this week of all weeks, when we "remember them" it is time to say with one voice that we are Australians who believe that the conduct of Australian civil society should be governed by Australians, not a multinational NGO with an inflated ego and a patchy human rights record.

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READER COMMENTS

PAYG
25/04/2014 5:13:21 PM

"The one consideration that our beef producers should perhaps ask themselves about the GRSB is: Why is Cattle Council and the Fitzroy Basin Association, representing beef producers from a First World, democratic country, with an excellent reputation in science and land management and animal husbandry, entertaining the idea of subjecting those same producers to an authority which is not their government?" – because they have been Prescribed in the Structure via Regulation to do so; a structure that Fairfax Media has supported for more than 15 years.
Archibald
26/04/2014 6:42:01 AM

One has to ask what Hon. Barnaby Joyce is doing here. Does he support control by overseas interests in Australia. If he does do we need him and the rest who promised less red and green tape? Meanwhile his own prescribed bodies introduce more and more!! Lets just have global governance and he can retire on his excessive pension, and we can just struggle on without their non existent help.
The Serf
28/04/2014 9:55:19 AM

"A starting point is for the industry to shift its focus from things outside the boundary fence, that are outside its control, to things within the boundary fence that are a function of management and have a significant effect on business performance. The perception that beef producers are a homogenous group similarly affected by, and at the mercy of, external influences is a fallacy and prevents the self-assessment necessary to address the problem." -p67 The Northern beef report: 2013 situation analysis Brad, this is the problem, clearly identified!!
A matter of opinionA selection of editorials from around the Fairfax Agricultural Media group covering the issues of the week.

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