'Editing' genes for super food

14 Aug, 2014 02:00 AM
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Genetically edited fruits might be met with greater acceptance by society at large

RECENT advances allowing the precise editing of genomes now raise the possibility that fruit and other crops might be genetically improved without the need to introduce foreign genes, according to researchers writing in Cell Press publication Trends in Biotechnology on August 13.

With awareness of what makes these biotechnologies new and different, genetically edited fruits might be met with greater acceptance by society at large than genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been to date, according to the authors of the article.

This could mean genetically edited versions of GMOs such as 'super bananas' that produce more vitamin A, and apples that don’t brown when cut, among other novelties, could be making an appearance on grocery shelves.

“The simple avoidance of introducing foreign genes makes genetically edited crops more 'natural' than transgenic crops obtained by inserting foreign genes,” said Chidananda Nagamangala Kanchiswamy of Istituto Agrario San Michele, Italy.

For instance, changes to the characteristics of fruit might be made via small genetic tweaks designed to increase or decrease the amounts of natural ingredients that their plant cells already make.

Genome editing of fruit has become possible today due to the advent of new software and a growing knowledge of fruit genomes.

So far, editing tools have not been applied to the genetic modification of fruit crops. Most transgenic fruit crop plants have been developed using a plant bacterium to introduce foreign genes, and only papaya has been commercialised in part because of stringent regulation in the European Union (EU).

The researchers said genetically edited plants modified through the insertion, deletion, or altering of existing genes of interest, might even be deemed as non-genetically modified, depending on the interpretation of the EU commission and member state regulators.

Fruit crops are but one example of dozens of possible future applications for genetically edited organisms (GEOs), according to Kanchiswamy and his colleagues.

That would open the door to the development of crops with superior qualities and perhaps allow their commercialisation, even in countries in which GMOs have so far met with harsh criticism and controversy.

“We would like people to understand that crop breeding through biotechnology is not restricted only to GMOs,” he said.

“Transfer of foreign genes was the first step to improve our crops, but GEOs will surge as a 'natural' strategy to use biotechnology for a sustainable agricultural future.”

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READER COMMENTS

Mug
14/08/2014 7:50:18 AM

Well this opens a new can of worms. In the right hands GM is a good science. It should be in the hands of our own CSIRO and funded by us all. I see the current system, to use an old saying like, " Putting the fox in charge of the chooks" or a new one " Put the Muslim in charge of the Christians"
Hebe
14/08/2014 6:02:15 PM

What a load of rubbish! "insertion, deletion, or altering of existing genes of interest, might even be deemed as non-genetically modified" Changing the genetic blueprint of an organism with transgenics or cisgenics is not natural! This is clearly more GM Industry PR at work.
Bob Phelps
15/08/2014 2:50:33 PM

"... GMOs such as 'super bananas' that produce more vitamin A, and apples that don’t brown when cut, among other novelties." Novelties, indeed! Most GM promises are empty as genetic manipulation techniques are limited. Dr Richards of CSIRO Plant Industry says: "GM technologies are generally only suitable for the single gene traits, not complex multigenic ones.” And Dr Burrow, of the Beef CRC, says: "thousands, of interacting genes control important production traits like growth rate, feed efficiency & meat quality - not the handful that researchers had originally believed.” let's move on!

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