Goldenover wins Ile de France rivalry

16 Mar, 2017 02:04 AM
Comments
0
 
Goldenover stud principal Ray Batt, (left), Narrogin, was delighted when judge Braden Lange awarded the Ile de France champion and reserve champion sashes to two of his finest rams, the second of which is held by Western Australian College of Agriculture, Narrogin, student Zoe Dawson.
Goldenover stud principal Ray Batt, (left), Narrogin, was delighted when judge Braden Lange awarded the Ile de France champion and reserve champion sashes to two of his finest rams, the second of which is held by Western Australian College of Agriculture, Narrogin, student Zoe Dawson.

NOTHING ignites a healthy dose of sibling rivalry like a competitive showing, and when it came to the Ile de France section of the judging, it was the ultimate 'Battle of the Batt Brothers'.

Ray and Colin Batt were the only two breeders representing the Ile de France breed for the third time at the Make Smoking History Wagin Woolorama, but that didn't diminish the excellent quality of the 19 entrants in this section.

Ray Batt presented a number of Ile de France rams and ewes from his Goldenover stud, Narrogin, while Colin Batt flew the flag for the breed from his Alcostro stud, Wagin.

The judging was once again carried out by Braden Lange, Mirovi Texel stud, Narrogin, who was impressed by the calibre of animals both studs presented.

When it came to the rams, Goldenover dominated and was awarded both champion and reserve champion for two of its burly sires.

The champion initially entered the ring in the ram under one year, showing milk teeth class, while the reserve came from the class of pairs.

Sired by a son of Australian Ile de France 6003, both rams were grandsons of embryos imported from South Africa's top Ile de France stud, Denvor, a program that has been very successful for Goldenover.

Goldenover also won champion ewe, with Alcostro being awarded the reserve champion ewe sash, which initially won the ewe over one-year-old category.

The Goldenover champion ewe came from the ewe under one year, showing milk teeth section and was also a descendant of Australian Ile de France 6003.

It was so impressive that Mr Lange decided it was the worthy recipient of the grand champion Ile de France ribbon, defeating the champion ram with its tremendous thickness and balance.

"For me it was an easy decision, the ewe was very well-balanced and feminine which made her a worthy winner," Mr Lange said.

"I think her structure and muscling was spot on, which is hugely important to the breed.

"The champion ram also had all the attributes I think the breed needs, in terms of being structurally correct and well-muscled, but he just lacked the refinement of the ewe.

"In all, there has been a very good showing of sheep today and the breeders should be proud of the animals they have produced and selected."

FarmWeekly

POST A COMMENT


Screen name *
Email address *
Remember me?
Comment *
 

COMMENTS

light grey arrow
Well done Steve,it is easy to see why Purchers have been so successful over 5 decades
light grey arrow
Reality of supply and demand. I remember many oat marketers including CBH saying while they were
light grey arrow
At a $114 per tonne i feel like we have been bent over & abused .They went out of their way to