Angus bull tops Monterey sale

29 May, 2015 02:00 AM
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With the $9500 top-priced Angus bull at the Monterey Winter Bull Sale at Brunswick last week were Monterey stud's Scott River property manager Josh White (left), Elders Bunbury sale co-ordinator Michael Carroll, Landmark Capel agent Chris Waddingham and Landmark senior stud stock auctioneer John Wirth. Mr Waddingham purchased the bull on behalf of Treeton Lake, Cowaramup.
The bull had a beautiful balance of depth, thickness, length and style
With the $9500 top-priced Angus bull at the Monterey Winter Bull Sale at Brunswick last week were Monterey stud's Scott River property manager Josh White (left), Elders Bunbury sale co-ordinator Michael Carroll, Landmark Capel agent Chris

VALUES reached $9500 for an Angus bull to cap off the extremely strong Monterey Murray Grey and Angus seventh annual winter bull sale last week at Brunswick.

With 76 registered buyers and another surge in confidence on the back of unprecedented beef prices recorded earlier in the week, all signs were pointing to a cracker of a sale.

And the buyers delivered on expectation.

After a nervous start on the opening few lots, buyers shifted up a gear with the bidding momentum continuing through to the final lot.

After the 66th and final bull had been through the ring, the Elders and Landmark teams had cleared all bar one bull at auction to average $5754 overall.

This marked a significant $1359 lift in overall average compared to last year’s sale where 38 of 57 bulls sold to average $4395.

Angus recorded another strong result with a total clearance of 36 bulls to average $5944, a $1244 improvement in average on last year where 29 of 31 bulls averaged $4700.

The Murray Greys saw 29 of 30 bulls sell to average $5517.

This capped off a stunning recovery from last year’s modest results where nine of 26 bulls sold to average $3411, a mighty $2106 jump in average.

The sale’s $9500 top price was notched up in lot three when Landmark Capel agent Chris Waddingham, representing Treeton Lake, Cowaramup, placed the final bid on the outstanding sire Monterey Jumbuck J35.

The 948 kilogram son of Koojan Hills Unlimited F237 and Monterey Heartache E160 recorded raw data of 40kg birthweight, frame score six, 44cm scrotal circumference (SC), 130cm2 eye muscle area (EMA) and 5.1pc intra muscular fat (IMF).

Mr Waddingham said Jumbuck was the stand-out Angus bull in the catalogue.

“Treeton Lake was the losing bidder on the bull’s sire three years ago so the genetics were a drawcard,” Mr Waddingham said.

“The bull had a beautiful balance of depth, thickness, length and style.”

He said another contributing factor was the bull’s strong maternal characteristics.

“Treeton Lake runs 250 Angus breeders and their business is built around supplying quality Angus females to the market through the Landmark specially selected female sales at Boyanup,” Mr Waddingham said.

The sale’s $7250 second top-price was paid by several buyers including standout buyer Thomas International Foods, South Australia, represented over the phone by Michael Carroll, Elders Bunbury.

At the end of the Angus run, the account tallied a total of 13 Angus bulls priced from $5000 to $7250.

The account’s top price was paid for lot five containing Monterey Diamond Jack J142, a 840kg son of Vermont Duke E193 with raw data of 34kg, 5.5 FS, 46cm SC, 128cm2 EMA and 4.5pc IMF.

FL & MJ Dewar also outlaid $7250 for a young 810kg early September 2013-born son of Monterey Diplomat D184 with raw data of 38kg BW, 6.4 FS, 37cm SC, 124cm2 EMA and 5.5pc IMF.

Jamie Abbs, Landmark Boyup Brook, representing JHH Bowie & Co, Bridgetown, highlighted the depth of the Monterey herd when he paid $7250 for the sale replacement bull Monterey Jason J106, a mid-May 2013 drop son of Carenda Stockman D34 with raw data of 40kg BW, 7 FS, 47cm SC, 132cm2 EMA and 4.4pc IMF.

With 19 individual Angus bull buyers, the only other multiple buyers with two bulls each were Terry Tarbotton, Elders Nannup, representing TWT Dickson, Nannup, for $6750 and $5250 and MG & BF Stanbishop, Narrikup, for $6000 and $5500.

Topping the Murray Grey section was Monterey Jumbuck J183 in lot 48 when Mal Barrett, Elders Boyanup, representing Peter and Judy Middleton, P & J Middleton, Lowden, bid to $7000.

The 754kg silver son of homebred parents Corroboree and Melissa F268 displayed a balanced set of growth and carcase data within the breed’s top 25 per cent for most traits including top 5pc for scrotal size (SC) (+2.0), eye muscle (EMA) (+2.6) and retail beef yield (RBY) (+2.0).

The Middletons run a split herd of 200 Angus and 200 Murray Grey breeders and have been sourcing some bulls from the Monterey stud for six years.

The Middletons also purchased a Monterey Escalator son for $5250.

Mr Barrett said the Middleton family had significantly improved their herd by sourcing top bulls.

“The Middletons are regular suppliers of cattle to the Elders weaner sales at Boyanup in the summer,” he said.

“To lift the quality and really produce a top product, they have been trying to buy bulls from the top 20pc of the bull sales they attend.

“The top bull had a magnificent temperament, was extremely well balanced and had a true Murray Grey head.”

The $6500 second top price was paid by both the volume buyers in the Murray Grey line-up with Kanandah station, Kalgoorlie, and BV Smith, Mettler, collecting four bulls each and paying from $5000 to $6500.

Kanandah station bid to $6500 on its first selection and the fifth bull into the ring, Monterey Jindalbie J232.

The 858kg Jindalbie was an early July 2013-drop son of Monterey Freight Train and described as one of the picks of the catalogue.

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Kane Chatfield

Kane Chatfield

is a livestock representative for Farm Weekly

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