GM contamination test case lodged in Supreme Court

04 Apr, 2012 08:59 AM
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5
 
Kojonup farmer Steve Marsh.
Kojonup farmer Steve Marsh.

COMMON law rights and the ability of Australian farmers to protect their crops from genetically modified contamination will be tested in a landmark case lodged in the West Australian Supreme Court.

A writ lodged in the Supreme Court yesterday on behalf of Kojonup farmer Steve Marsh will test the common law rights of property owners to recover losses as a result of genetically modified contamination on their land and their rights to prevent future contamination.

The legal action has been taken after about 70 per cent of Mr Marsh’s farm was stripped of its organic certification in 2010.

The claim, lodged by law firm Slater & Gordon, alleges Mr Marsh’s property was contaminated by GM canola seed from his neighbour’s property. It is alleged that the canola seed was blown onto Mr Marsh’s property contaminating his land before harvest and causing the substantial loss of the farm’s organic status.

Slater & Gordon, Practice Group Leader, Mark Walter said Mr Marsh was seeking damages for the loss of his organic certification and a permanent injunction to protect his farm from future contamination.

He said the cost of the contamination is yet to be fully determined as Mr Marsh is yet to regain his organic certification status, and is still suffering an annual yield financial loss as a result.

Slater & Gordon said it is conducting Mr Marsh's case as a public interest case. The case is also being supported by the Safe Food Foundation.

Safe Food Foundation Director Scott Kinnear said Mr Marsh’s case would be an important test case both within Australia and internationally. We have been contacted by people in Europe and Canada who are watching this case closely.

“It’s the first time that Australian laws about competing land uses involving GM and non-GM crops have been tested,” Mr Kinnear said.

“There are many other farms that have suffered contamination in Australia. The result of this case could clarify how farmer’s legal rights apply in these situations,” Mr Kinnear said.

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READER COMMENTS

blahblah
4/04/2012 2:36:16 PM, on Farm Weekly

I understand there is a fund for the Marsh, but has there been one set up for the Baxters?
Shirley C
4/04/2012 8:11:05 PM, on Farm Weekly

Organic agriculture is the oldest form of agriculture on earth. All types of crops can be grown organically. GM crops are the new arrivals, limited to just a few types, and banned in many parts of the world. In this the Year of the Farmer, with increasing consumer demands for "truth in labelling", to know where our food comes from and to make informed choices about what we are eating, we will be watching with interest and concern to see how this dichotomy is managed and resolved.
Bring it on
8/04/2012 9:46:51 AM, on Farm Weekly

It is time to knock patented foods on the head. They're not properly tested. America, where GMO's are consumed, spends more on "health" than anyone yet has a massive health problem. Who wants to follow that lead? Most Western Australians DO NOT WANT GMO's rammed down their throats. Federal & state governments need to get the message. Hands off our food!!! Most people, especially MOTHERS, want BETTER quality, NO PESTICIDE, TRULY ORGANIC, FRESH & HEALTHY foods. All the lobbiests can say what they want to but patented genetically-engineered, mulit-pesticided so called "foods" are NOT WANTED!!
blahblah
10/04/2012 7:33:27 AM, on Farm Weekly

Bring it on, What about the people who can't afford organic?
canberra lawyer
29/05/2013 7:04:24 PM, on Farm Weekly

What exactly is in GM crops that's messing up so bad? Why do they even make such crap? Yes I agree, organic agriculture is still best for everyone.

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You had better check your sources ATB!
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I came across this article on Arrabiddy Station. The brick homestead was built in august
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I couldn't think of anything more painful or fruitless than sitting on a board that does not