Grains industry thoughts on 2013

26 Dec, 2013 01:00 AM
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The big highlight for 2013 was the turnaround in seasonal conditions in July...

SOME key players in the WA grains industry share their thoughts on the 2013 season.

Emerald Grain WA general manager Dick McCagh

What message would you like to offer to WA growers?

Dick McCagh: 2013 has demonstrated that the deregulated market is fully operational in WA.

Pricing volatility is now a daily experience.

Although some growers find grain marketing frustrating at times, many opportunities exist in the deregulated market.

It is more important than ever for growers to keep in contact with their local grain merchant or trading manager so they can assist with identifying marketing opportunities.

What was the highlight of 2013?

DM: The big highlight for 2013 was the turnaround in seasonal conditions in July that has helped most of the State look forward to a profitable season.

While tough times have been experienced in some areas, generally we have had good rainfall and we are looking at one of WA's biggest-yielding seasons.

Other highlights include watching the Emerald team on the ground grow with their local communities, working together with growers to make grain marketing decisions that complement the seasonal conditions.

What was the biggest challenge of 2013?

DM: Seasonal conditions in June and July put pressure on growers who were concerned about production.

This posed a big challenge as management of contracts is always a problem for the grower and the trade alike.

The volatility of a serious FIS-priced market also proved difficult, but all-in-all it has been a very rewarding season for growers.

What is on the cards for 2014?

Emerald Grain is gearing up for a big year in 2014 and our people play a big role in our future.

We have three great regional managers leading a strong team that is strategically located throughout the State to ensure we are able to support growers in different regions.

We have created new products as well as modified existing products to suit the changing environment of grain marketing.

For the last few years we have focused on trying to manage risk with growers and we have had a range of three Windows options which have been very beneficial for all involved.

Our aim is to continue to manage risk and work with growers to deliver the best results possible for all concerned.

Through our business partner Sumitomo, we are expanding our relationships with customers throughout Asia to grow more opportunities to sell Australian grain to this growing market.

Vicstock managing director Will Crozier

What message would you like to offer to WA growers?

Will Crozier: That there will be more markets opening up to WA growers through the operations of overseas investment companies, equating to more exposure for our products and hopefully fully realising the farm gate value of such high quality WA wheat.

What was the highlight of 2013?

WC: Undoubtedly harvest.

What was the biggest challenge of 2013?

Sowing our crop and paddock preparation from a delayed start.

What is on the cards for 2014?

WC: An expanded crop area and functional grain terminal at Albany port.

Do you have any advice you would like to share with WA growers?

WC: There is a very sound future for the family farm and while corporate farming will ebb and flow, the backbone of the WA wheat crop will continue to be harvested from the family run farm.

Vicstock Grain recognises this and we will continue to work with farmers, suppliers and farming bodies to achieve the best farm gate outcome for all WA farm products.

WA Grain Groups executive Ray Marshall

What message would you like to offer to WA growers?

Ray Marshall: Don't ever underestimate our ability to produce quantity and a quality product of grain, meat or fibre.

The new generation of WA farmers are very good at what they do, however, the rewards and recognition must be better acknowledged, both by governments and the wider Australian community.

What was the highlight of 2013?

RM: The highlight was to be part of the WA Grain Group's delegation to China. Every farmer should go. Their agriculture, growth and infrastructure is amazing. The other highlight was the best season I have experienced in my 50 years of farming.

What was the biggest challenge of 2013?

RM: Trying to compete globally. Our high supply chain cost and third world transport infrastructure makes WA agriculture uncompetitive.

Australian agriculture suffers similar symptoms as GMH and Qantas. Let us not be frightened of foreign investment.

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative director Stephen Powles

What message would you like to offer to WA growers?

Steve Powles: Congratulations on demonstrating that with adequate rainfall and technologies available today you have produced 15 million tonnes of grain food for the world.

What was the highlight of 2013?

SP: For me the highlight was the adoption by WA grain growers of harvest weed seed control techniques .

This harvest I have seen many more chaff carts, narrow windrows, chaff/weed-seed onto tramlines and a few new De Bruin engineering Harrington Seed Destructors in operation on farms.

What was the biggest challenge of 2013?

SP: The dry start to the season which again showed the huge contribution that no-till farming achieves by enabling crop establishment with very minimal moisture.

What is on the cards for 2014?

SP: Taking the AHRI harvest weed seed control techniques nationally, as harvest weed-seed control adoption in the east is currently minimal but there are big needs and thus opportunity.

Do you have any advice you would like to share with WA growers?

SP: Take a well-earned post-harvest holiday before thinking about the 2014 crop campaign.

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READER COMMENTS

Deregul8
27/12/2013 7:21:43 AM, on Farm Weekly

"2013 has demonstrated that the deregulated market is fully operational in WA". Not quite Dick. Just need to continue smashing the port monopoly and we are there. going to take time but the competition is working hard for us. CBH off with the train fairies procuring grain in far away lands to "return value to growers".

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