Rains fall just in time

25 Apr, 2013 01:30 AM
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DECENT SHOWERS: Eyre Peninsula farmer Trevor Veitch (pictured with a DE Engineering grain cleaning and screening plant he bought at a clearing sale at Darke Peak last Wednesday) had 12 millimetres over the weekend. He said he was likely to start seeding in a week's time if there were some good follow-up showers.
DECENT SHOWERS: Eyre Peninsula farmer Trevor Veitch (pictured with a DE Engineering grain cleaning and screening plant he bought at a clearing sale at Darke Peak last Wednesday) had 12 millimetres over the weekend. He said he was likely to start seeding in a week's time if there were some good follow-up showers. "I'd like to see some more rain before starting seeding," he said.

WIDESPREAD falls at the weekend has given South Australian farmers some confidence to get seeding underway on Anzac Day.

There was some isolated seeding before the rains, but they mean season 2013 will officially start.

The showers were a welcome respite for soil that had been deprived of moisture for about six months.

The biggest falls were on the far west coast, with 38 millimetres at Penong, and 29mm at Nundroo. Other parts of the Eyre Peninsula received from 9mm at Wudinna to 26mm at Wirrulla and Elliston.

Coorabie farmers Bryan and Di Smith, who farm south of Nundroo in the far west, received 34mm on Sunday and Monday.

"We haven't had that much rain since July last year, so we were well and truly looking for it, but we're very pleased with what we got," Mrs Smith said.

"We've just started seeding some clover and plan to get into canola this week."

The other very high falls were on Kangaroo Island, with 52mm at Parndana and 50mm at American River. The Fleurieu Peninsula also had a drenching, with 60mm at Parawa and 48mm at Myponga.

Hope Forest cattle producer Colin Blacker said his property received 26mm three weeks ago that caused a good germination, and this follow-up rain of 50mm was just perfect.

"That first rain caused the best germination of clover we've had for many years," he said.

"I'd been a bit concerned about the perennial grasses because of the dry season but it seems to be ticking along now."

Mr Blacker said the past week's falls provided valuable run-off for his dams.

"This is really important because we have no irrigation, so dams are our lifeblood," he said.

The Lower North had handy falls with 21mm at Stockport and 19mm at Kapunda.

Truro farmer Paul Doering was very pleased with the falls he received.

"At Dutton we had close to 25mm in total, including Monday night. At the southern end of our properties at Moculta we had in excess of 30mm," he said.

"As long as we can get some follow-up rain, it will be a really positive start."

Mr Doering said he would wait for a weed germination and spray it out before starting his cropping program.

"I'll probably sow a little bit of feed for the stock this week, but seeding crops will be within the next couple of weeks," he said.

"Stock feed is tight, we've been out and about supplementary feeding, so hopefully some extra feed kicks in soon."

The Yorke Peninsula had falls of 24mm at Curramulka and 26mm at Kadina.

YP AG agriservices agronomist Chris Davey said most farmers on the upper YP received 17mm to 30mm.

"That will be enough to get early crops like canola, oaten hay and beans in," he said.

"But other crops like wheat will be another week to 10 days away, to get the weeds up and sprayed out before starting sowing about the first week of May.

"That spray will be important because we haven't had any opportunities to get on top of ryegrass or brome grass yet."

Mr Davey said the last significant rainfall in the district had been in early August last year.

"I was soil testing last week and the majority of paddocks had minimal or no moisture, and that's with deep soil testing to 60-80mm," he said.

"So hopefully we'll see more follow up rains in the next 10 to 14 days, so people can continue sowing."

The Upper South East had falls of between 8mm at Keith and up to 23mm at Coonalpyn.

*Full report in Stock Journal, April 25 issue, 2013.

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Clearly, CMT and Jock are envious of growers taking a calculated risk and forward selling. They
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Agree with Fiona - this property is not cheap. Another thing - Mitchell grass is good - but 20
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Two highly successful Australian owned companies that publically state that they want to source