Auctioneers learn new tricks of trade

22 Jun, 2014 02:00 AM
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Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association chief executive officer Andy Madigan (centre), flanked by speech pathologists Eliza Galvin and Lou Philpot and WAMIA Muchea Livestock Centre manager Lyndon Henning (left) with Landmark and Primaries staff, agents and managers at the auctioneering school
We show auctioneers how to identify any difficulties they might be having and what to do about it
Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association chief executive officer Andy Madigan (centre), flanked by speech pathologists Eliza Galvin and Lou Philpot and WAMIA Muchea Livestock Centre manager Lyndon Henning (left) with Landmark and

THE Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association (ALPA) held its first auctioneering school in WA at the Muchea Livestock Centre last week.

A strong registration of aspiring Landmark and Primaries auctioneers joined already licensed and experienced auctioneers to learn valuable techniques to develop or refine their skills.

Attendees, including company representatives, agents and managers, were given an update of issues that could influence their roles and clients.

Speech pathologists ran through the technical side of their voice and selling at simulated cattle and sheep auctions, where their performance was recorded to provide valuable feedback.

ALPA chief executive officer Andy Madigan was pleased with the attendance, and said he hoped to make it an annual event and have WA representation in the national auctioneering competition next year.

"We were pleased to have 22 people attend the first school," Mr Madigan said.

"In the near future, we plan to hold a selection school to name the finalists to compete for the WA auctioneering champion and runner up.

"And hopefully we will have WA representation at the 2015 ALPA National Young Auctioneering Competition in Sydney to compete against winners from the other States."

Speech pathologists Eliza Galvin, Melbourne, Victoria, and Lou Philpot, Perth, said they focused on breathing technique and control, voice projection, clarity and posture.

"We teach how to look after their voice so auctioneers can sell for a long time, not only throughout the day but over their careers," Ms Galvin said.

"And we show auctioneers how to identify any difficulties they might be having and what to do about it."

Kane Chatfield

Kane Chatfield

is a livestock representative for Farm Weekly

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