Phoenix rises to mapping challenge

16 Jun, 2016 02:00 AM
Comments
0
 
The Phoenix 2 from Sentera has professional-grade autopilot allowing the grid patterns specified to be mapped pre-flight.
The Phoenix 2 from Sentera has professional-grade autopilot allowing the grid patterns specified to be mapped pre-flight.

Unmanned aerial vehicle maker, Sentera has released the lightweight, durable fixed wing, Phoenix 2 offering a new level of control and precision..

Sentera chief aerospace engineer, Todd Colten said the Phoenix 2 “brings a level of precision and accuracy to UAVs that hasn’t been seen before.

“Users can now collect highly detailed data quickly, and with complete certainty about its accuracy.”

He said the professional-grade autopilot allowed the grid pattern specified to be mapped pre-flight.

“The drone knows exactly what line to follow to get the exact looping radius, and the exact flight level needed for perfect tiling.”

At 1.8 kilograms, the Phoenix 2 is easily hand-launched in just a few steps, and can carry multiple sensor options for up to an hour of flight time.

The professional-grade autopilot is part of what makes the precision possible as it constantly auto-calculates and auto-optimizes according to the grid pattern specified to ensure the data collected meets exact specifications.

“Growers are using the Phoenix 2 with agriculture-specific sensors to collect RGB, NIR, and NDVI imagery, Mr Colten said.

“That imagery is so precise [the growers] tell us they’re targeting and treating specific parts of their fields, and then they’re using fewer chemicals, saving money and increasing yields.

“Follow-up flights can be programmed to use the same pattern for exact data comparison at multiple times throughout the growing season,” he said.

“We’re getting great feedback from our customers.”

FarmOnline
Tom McKenny

Tom McKenny

is the national machinery writer for Fairfax Agricultural Media

POST A COMMENT


Screen name *
Email address *
Remember me?
Comment *
 

COMMENTS

light grey arrow
The Minister of Ag can use WA's Gene Technology Act 2006 to manage GM & GM-free crops for market
light grey arrow
Time will judge if they can implement what growers are asking for. Not what a director
light grey arrow
Absolutely agreed. Chinese demand for high-quality protein is increasing, as is demand from