Repeat supreme for Claypans stud

29 Sep, 2016 09:52 AM
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With the grand champion Poll Merino ram and champion strong wool Poll Merino ram were associate judge Lauren Rayner (left), WA College of Agriculture, Narrogin, judges Angus Beveridge, Wyuna stud, Armatree, New South Wales, Scott P
In the end we couldn't go past the Claypans rams - it is a great sheep.
With the grand champion Poll Merino ram and champion strong wool Poll Merino ram were associate judge Lauren Rayner (left), WA College of Agriculture, Narrogin, judges Angus Beveridge, Wyuna stud, Armatree, New South Wales, Scott P

FOR the second year running it was a show to remember for the Bolt family's Claypans stud, Corrigin, when it went back-to-back winning all three major awards in the Merino judging ring at this year's IGA Perth Royal Show, including the prestigious supreme exhibit title with a classy strong wool Poll Merino sire.

It was an almighty effort for the Bolts, who have been exhibiting at the show since 1997, to claim the trifecta of coveted awards all breeders chase - the supreme exhibit, the junior champion and the group of three rams under 1.5 years - for a second year running, given that they had only achieved the feat for the first time last year and it hasn't been achieved by too many other breeders over the years.

When the upstanding ram was announced the supreme champion it was the icing on the cake for the family and made it consecutive supreme titles for the stud.

Prior to last year the Bolts hadn't taken home the purple broad supreme ribbon since 2006, despite having a number of rams and ewes in the supreme line-up over the years.

Before the ram earned the supreme ribbon it had to overcome a Merino sire from the Eungai stud, Miling, as well as a Merino ewe and a Poll Merino ewe both from the Eastville Park stud, Wickepin and a fellow Claypans team member which had been sashed the junior champion.

It wasn't an easy decision for the judges as all the other exhibits were standouts in their own rights.

But in the end they couldn't go past the Claypans sire for its size, structure and power of wool.

Strong wool judge Scott Pickering, Derella Downs and Pyramid Poll studs, Cascade, said all five sheep in the supreme line-up were top sheep and a credit to the breeders.

"In the end we couldn't go past the Claypans rams - it is a great sheep," Mr Pickering said.

"It is a big, upstanding ram which is structurally correct with a masculine muzzle and purity throughout.

"He is also very even in the wool and shows good staple length and cutting ability."

Also full of praise for the ram was medium wool judge Peter Stockman, Springvale North Poll Merino stud, Burra, South Australia, who said it ticked all the boxes and had a great overall outlook.

"It has good size and bone, stands up well and has good purity," Mr Stockman said.

"He also has good cutting ability and will cut a stack of wool."

The ram started on its winning way when it won its strong wool Poll Merino ram class and was sashed the champion strong wool Poll Merino ram.

From there it went on to be sashed the grand champion Poll Merino ram.

The six-tooth ram, which was sired by Claypans 179, had wool measurements of 20.1 micron, 3.5 SD, 17.3 CV and 98.7 per cent comfort factor.

The ram was sashed the reserve champion strong wool August shorn Poll Merino ram at the Australian Sheep & Wool Show in Bendigo, Victoria, in July and champion strong wool ram at this year's Make Smoking History Wagin Woolorama.

p Poll Merinos

The Claypans supreme exhibit was pushed all the way in the Poll Merino ram section and doing the chasing was another young sire from the Claypans stud, when it was sashed the reserve grand champion Poll Merino ram.

Taking home the reserve grand champion ribbon for the stud was a well-made medium wool ram and when it received its ribbon Mr Pickering said the ram had a great frame and was well structured.

"He is a broad ram with a good length of body," Mr Pickering said.

"He also has a nice, bright, white wool and there is plenty of it."

The six-tooth ram is from a Claypans syndicate mating and had wool figures of 19.8 micron, 3.2 SD, 16.5 CV and 99.8pc CF.

The ram was in the grand champion line-up after it was sashed the champion medium wool Poll Merino ram.

Leading the way in the ewe championship was the Mullan family's Eastville Park stud, when a medium wool ewe from the stud got the judges' nod and was sashed the grand champion Poll Merino ewe.

When the grand champion ribbon was draped over the ewe, Mr Stockman said the ewe was a big, bulky ewe, which showed good cutting ability.

"She has great body size and stands up nice and square," he said.

"She also has good purity and is carrying a good medium wool."

The four-tooth, AI-bred ewe by Coromandel Sir Thomas (ET2) had wool figures of 20.1 micron, 2.9 SD, 14.4 CV and 99.7pc CF.

Prior to being sashed the grand champion, the ewe was sashed the champion medium wool Poll Merino ewe and won its class for medium wool Poll Merino ewes over 1.5 years showing a minimum of four permanent teeth in front of four other ewes.

Finishing in reserve to the Eastville Park ewe and being sashed the reserve grand champion Poll Merino ewe, was a ewe from the Button family's Manunda stud, Tammin.

Fine wool judge Angus Beveridge, Wyuna stud, Armatree, New South Wales, said it was an outstanding ewe, which stood up square and had a good structure.

"She is also consistent and even all over in the wool," Mr Beveridge said.

"She is carrying a great, crimpy wool and will be a good wool cutter."

The four-tooth ewe, which is by Winyar Chappy, carried wool figures of 17.3 micron, 2.7 SD, 15.7 CV and 99.9pc CF.

The ewe was also sashed the champion fine wool Poll Merino ewe.

p Merinos

Top honours were shared in the Merino judging with the Eungai stud, Miling, exhibiting the grand champion ram and the Eastville Park stud, exhibiting the grand champion ewe.

Winning the grand champion Merino ram ribbon for the McLagan family's Eungai stud was a productive, strong wool sire.

When announcing the ram as the grand champion, Mr Pickering, said the ram had a power of wool and a good structure.

"He is a big, upstanding ram, with a good muzzle and horn set and he is also pure through the head," Mr Pickering said.

"In terms of his wool he is carrying a nice, long-stapled, well-nourished, strong wool and there is plenty of it.

"He is a really productive ram."

Prior to being sashed the grand champion, the ram was sashed the champion strong wool Merino ram.

The four-tooth ram carries the Eungai Juddy bloodline and displayed wool figures in the ring of 21.4 micron, 3.6 SD, 16.7 CV and 99.3pc CF.

Standing in reserve to the Eungai sire and being sashed the reserve grand champion Merino ram was a fine wool sire from the Rintoul family's Tilba Tilba stud, Williams.

Mr Beveridge said the Tilba Tilba ram was an upstanding fine wool sire which was true to type.

"He is carrying a soft-handling, bright, white, fine wool all over, with a good even crimp," he said.

"He has beautiful coverage all over from his head to his belly which is important for fine wools to have."

The six-tooth sire, was from the stud's Purple family and carried wool figures of 16.8 micron, 3.3 SD, 19.7 CV and 100pc CF.

The ram was also sashed the champion fine wool Merino ram.

In the ewe classes it was a medium wool ewe from the Mullan family's Eastville Park stud that was sashed the grand champion Merino ewe.

Mr Stockman said the ewe was big and square and stood up extremely well.

"She has a great spring of rib and is well-balanced," Mr Stockman said.

"She also shows terrific purity and is carrying a long-stapled, bright crimpy, medium wool that opens up really well from top to bottom."

The Eastville Park ewe earned the right to compete for the grand champion ribbon after being sashed the champion medium wool ewe and winning its class for medium wool ewes over 1.5 years showing a minimum of four permanent teeth in front of four other ewes.

The four-tooth ewe, which is a grand-daughter of East Mundalla Jonty, had wool figures of 20.7 micron, 3.1 SD, 14.8 CV and 99.6pc CF.

The Boorabbin stud, Wannamal, exhibited the reserve grand champion Merino ewe.

Mr Beveridge said it was a big fine wool ewe with size and bulk.

"She has terrific scale for a fine wool, good purity and is carrying a lovely crimping wool which is very even," he said.

The four-tooth ewe is based on pure Boorabbin breeding and had wool figures of 19.3 micron, 2.9 SD, 15.2 CV and 99.7pc CF.

The ewe stood in the grand championship line-up after being sashed the champion fine wool Merino ewe and winning its class for fine wool Merino ewes over 1.5 years ahead of three other ewes.

FarmWeekly
Jodie Rintoul

Jodie Rintoul

is Farm Weekly's livestock manager

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