$1200 twice for

26 Sep, 2001 10:00 PM
Comments
0
 

By CHELSEA CORMELL

DESPITE facing one of their toughest years on record, Brockham stud returned impressive results at their annual ram sale last week, hitting a $1200 top for two rams.

While doubts existed earlier in the year whether the sale would go ahead, Brockman actually improved clearance rates by 7pc on last year to 89pc and matched last year's average of $536.

Successful buyers of the top rams, were regulars to the Brockham sale, Lake Magenta farmers Gerald and Philip Salvage, who found the 18.8 and 18.9 micron of the rams irresistible.

In a total draught of six rams, the Salvage's also snapped up the equal third top ram at $1100, who had a 18.7 micron reading.

The stud's oldest clients, Ross Cappell and Sons, who have been buying from Brockman since they began in 1935, picked up the largest number of rams at the sale.

They took home11 rams at an average of $636 and $900 top.

Locals JC and M Lay also bid hard to start, to collect the equal third top ram and the second biggest draught of the day of 10 rams.

Other major clients were Lake King-based Coleraine family, collecting eight, Dunkeld and Company, Newdegate, RD Walter, Newdegate, and Carmody Holdings, Kulin - each with six rams.

Newdegate-based Marbilling Downs bought the largest number of Poll Merinos, claiming seven at a $471 average.

Wesfarmers Landmark auctioneer Tony Wetherall said the sale attracted buyers who had were especially selective on micron, which averaged 20.6 on Brockman Polls and 19.1 on Merino rams, from August 23 teats.

Stud principal Bruce Bishop said he was pleasantly surprised with the outcome.

"We wouldn't have thought we could sell earlier in the season, but we've recovered and still got strong local support," he said.

COMMENTS

light grey arrow
I'm one of the people who want marijuana to be legalized, some city have been approved it but
light grey arrow
#blueysmegacarshowandcruise2019 10 years on Daniels Ute will be apart of another massive cause.
light grey arrow
Australia's live animal trade is nothing but a blood stained industry that suits those who