THE new wool harvesting technique known as Bioclip is gaining popularity with overseas wool processo

31 May, 2007 07:00 PM
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Adding to the revolution in alternative harvesting techniques is the Elders initiative to sell Bioclip lambs wool still in the nets.

Merino lamb¹s fleece wool less than 55mm in length and still in Bioclip nets has already been sent to China for processing.

More than 150 bales from throughout Australia were sent to the Ningbo-based Reward mill for processing in March.

The process involves the wool and net being removed from the lamb and pressed directly into the bale with no further wool handling required.

Upon delivery, testing of the bales is undertaken as per normal and then a wool-in-net price is negotiated directly with Reward, China¹s largest wool processor.

The venture is aimed at generating cost efficiencies on-farm, while increasing the value of a woolgrower¹s wool by targeting the high value end of the specialist global wool market.

Elders currently have the exclusive supply chain program with Reward and premiums for the wool are being passed directly to the woolgrower.

According to Reward managing director Charles Ing, guaranteed skin-free wool was urgently required by the woollen knitting sector.

³Bioclip wool guarantees this, allowing us to expand into new profitable markets with this product,² Mr Ing said.

Early trials of the wool-in-nets program with Australian woolgrowers are being touted as enormously successful in bearing out the benefits of the program.

Bioclip national product manager Will Keen said woolgrowers were already in front cost-wise through the reduced handling and harvesting costs.

³The premiums paid for the guaranteed skin free wool are a further incentive to wool producers,² Mr Keen said.

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