WIAA 100: Liz Alexander

23 Mar, 2014 01:00 AM
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BASED in Emerald in Central Queensland, Liz Alexander shares her time between non-executive director roles and her consultancy Blue Dog Agribusiness which undertakes research, project management, strategic communication and extension delivery across eastern Australia.

Liz is a director of Plant Health Australia, independent chair of Rio Tinto’s Clermont Mine Groundwater and Environmental Reference Group, and chairperson of the Theodore Irrigation Scheme LMA Interim Board which is undertaking the due diligence of SunWater’s channel irrigation assets and developing a business proposal for local management of the scheme.

A long-term term supporter of sustainable agriculture, she has helped cotton growers in Central Queensland actively participate in myBMP for more than a decade. Liz also co-ordinates the national Better Sunflower program for the Australian Sunflower Association and is assisting Central Highlands and Woorabinda Councils with strategic workforce planning.

Liz is a former director of Cotton Australia, and her other current representative roles include the Australian Cotton Conference committee and the Central Queensland Regional Planning Committee which provides advice to the Minister on the preparation of the statutory regional plan, policies and implementation.

This has a strong focus on addressing land use conflict between the agricultural and the resource sectors.

Liz was recognised for her work in cropping in 2013 with the inaugural Women in Agriculture Award presented by the Grains Research Development Corporation for significant contribution to the grains industry, and the Central Highlands Cotton Growers and Irrigators Association Iain Mackay Memorial Award for service to industry.

COMMENTS

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