Lake Grace firm 'ajusts' to disc machine

Lake Grace Engineering WA AdjustABar agent


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 The New South Wales-made AjustABar in action. It is now officially distributed in WA by Lake Grace Engineering.

The New South Wales-made AjustABar in action. It is now officially distributed in WA by Lake Grace Engineering.

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Positive responses from WA farmers has already triggered a flurry of orders for the AjustABar disc chain.

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LAKE Grace Engineering has been officially appointed WA distributors for the AjustABar disc chain.

It has completed a licence agreement with New South Wales farmer and designer Nigel Martin, Albury, and plans already are in the making to expand Lake Grace Engineering’s premises to cater for assembly.

There also is a possibility of making the machines under licence.

According to Lake Grace Engineering owners Clint and Tracey Earnshaw, positive responses from WA farmers has already triggered a flurry of orders for this year.

“We’re still taking orders and we’re also making three units available for hire,” Ms Earnshaw said.

The one-size-fits-all design can handle a range of soil renovation duties from stubble clearing to obstinate tall, woody weed bushes.

“It already has been used for pre-seeding work chopping down stubble and also for cultivating pasture paddocks in preparation for re-sowing,” Mr Earnshaw said.

“You can get the discus into about three inches (75 millimetres) so it does a really good job cutting vines, wireweed, bluebush, and such and leaving the ground really level.

“We’ve only had positive comments from the farmers who have used it.”

As the name implies, adjustments can be made to the bar for modes of aggression.

“It can also be used to skim the soil to knock off melons and it can be used with less aggression to incorporate Treflan.

“The bar has certainly created a lot of interest and it’s pretty obvious how you can save at least one spray pass.

“I think the way it is designed creates a lot of flexibility and opportunities for renovation or soil amelioration incorporating lime or clay or gypsum.” 

The AjustABar comprises a main beam with four ground-following independent gangs of discs with on-the-go hydraulic control to increase or decrease pressure to suit soil conditions.

A smaller central gang at the rear of the main beam ensures the machine provides a full cut. 

Its angle and placement is also adjustable to suit all working positions.

And each disc gang has triple-lipped sealed bearings with grease nipples.

But the key feature is a simple mechanical sliding mechanism which can alter gang angles to set levels of aggression or to maintain a straight cut with minimal soil disturbance.

Working widths range between 14 metres and 16.5m with disc spacings at 20 centimetres

The bar folds in on itself for a transport width of 3.85m.

“We’re confident there’s a demand for this type of product throughout the Wheatbelt so we’ll be firing up full commercial production as soon as we can.”

According to Mr Martin, response to advertising in Farm Weekly over the past three weeks has drawn inquiries and sales from throughout the Wheatbelt.

“It has been a very positive response and we are working closely with Clint and Tracey to ensure we can provide the service and back-up for owners,” he said.

  • More information: Clint and Tracey Earnshaw 9865 1845. 
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