Hassell seeks another WoolProducers term

Hassell seeks another WoolProducers term


Agribusiness
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WoolProducers Australia (WPA) independent director and Pingelly sheep and cropping farmer John Hassell will seek another term on the board.

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WoolProducers Australia director and Pingelly mixed farmer John Hassell will seek another term later this year.

WoolProducers Australia director and Pingelly mixed farmer John Hassell will seek another term later this year.

WOOLPRODUCERS Australia (WPA) independent director and Pingelly sheep and cropping farmer John Hassell will seek another term on the board.

Mr Hassell is one of three independent WPA directors whose current terms expire later this year.

He and current WPA vice-president, Gippsland, Victoria, sheep farmer and Merino stud principal Steve Harrison have said they would renominate for their executive positions on the board of woolgrowers' national peak body.

The third director, former WA Great Southern sheep farmer and livestock contractor Jamie Rowe who moved to New South Wales in 2016 and now runs a sheep enterprise near Cooma, has indicated he will not seek re-election.

WA has a second voice on the 10-member board through WAFarmers' vice president and its WPA representative, Kojonup sheep farmer Steve McGuire.

Mr Hassell, who was also a CBH Group director for nine years before standing down last year, said he believed it was important for WA to maintain its level of representation on the WPA board.

"We're a big chunk of the national (wool) industry over here so we should have a strong voice on issues that affect all of us," Mr Hassell said.

"We proved we have that with the wool levy, we were the State that managed to roll (Australian Wool Innovation's recommendation of) two per cent," he said.

Mr Hassell and Mr McGuire, along with other WPA directors, were vocal opponents of maintaining the status quo 2pc levy automatically deducted from woolgrowers' wool cheques and paid to AWI to fund its marketing of wool and help fund its research and development programs.

They had a close win last year when WoolPoll preferences were counted for the first time in determining that a majority of woolgrowers supported cutting the levy to 1.5pc from July 1 this year, with the new levy to apply for three years.

There was strong support for 1.5pc in WA where record wool prices in 2017 and again in 2018 had increased the dollar value paid out by woolgrowers as wool levy significantly.

On Monday WPA called for nominations from woolgrower members who are eligible to be independent directors.

To be eligible, woolgrowers must have paid a wool levy at least once in the past three years, be a member of WPA or of a State farmer organisation affiliated with WPA and entitled to act as a company director.

Nominations must be received before 6pm on Friday, September 27.

If required, ballot papers will be distributed during October, with voting closing on Friday, November 6.

Results will be declared at the WPA annual general meeting in Canberra on Thursday, November 14.

The independent directors will be elected for two years.

"Democratically elected independent (board) members give anyone involved with wool growing in Australia the opportunity to be a part of the leadership team," said WPA president Ed Storey.

The WPA national executive was "predominantly made up of delegates from our State farming organisations members", Mr Storey said, but the three independent directors also contribute to "national and international policy development and advocacy on behalf of Australia's wool producing industry".

  • For information on nominating see woolproducers.com.au or contact info@woolproducers.com.au
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