Historic restored machines set for auction

Historic restored machines set for auction

Machinery
This McCormick Derring 10.20 is believed to be one of only two surviving world-wide.

This McCormick Derring 10.20 is believed to be one of only two surviving world-wide.

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HISTORIC farm machinery will go under the hammer at Benger on Saturday, October 12.

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HISTORIC farm machinery will go under the hammer at Benger on Saturday, October 12.

Starting at 10am, Elders is offering the remaining quality items from the Pailthorpe Estate, which was at one time the largest McCormick Deering/International collection in the southern hemisphere.

Rare and collectable tractors available include an original McCormick Deering Tracson 10-20 Special Industrial Model, believed to be one of only two surviving world-wide.

There is a 1930s-era International McCormick Deering Model 20 TracTracTor, fully restored and running.

And a 1928 International tray truck with wooden seat and cab is also for sale.

It is fully restored and in working order.

Numerous other McCormick Deering tractors from the 1930s and 1940s - original and fully restored -will also be offered for sale, together with a selection of parts such as bonnets, radiators and engines, together with collectables, antiques and tools.

For truck fans there is the 'Golden Fleece' Bedford truck and also a Morris Commercial, circa 1938.

International Harvester began building the McCormick-Deering 10-20 Industrial in 1923.

The tractor was considered to be a front-runner in tractor design and in 1924 a coil-spring front suspension was added, along with rear-wheel brakes, a high-back seat and a foot accelerator.

In 1925 the front suspension was changed to one with transverse leaf springs.

A famous 1928 International tray truck with wooden seat and cab.

A famous 1928 International tray truck with wooden seat and cab.

Also the tractor was given a high-speed high gear (more than 16 kilometres an hour).

In 1926 the 10-20 became the McCormick-Deering 20 Industrial, or Model 20.

The 10-20 looked much like the McCormick-Deering 15-30 but was considerably smaller.

With its two-plough rating, it replaced the International 8-16.

The engine was a 284 cubic inch, four-cylinder developing 18.5 kilowatts (25 horsepower) at the belt and 15kW (20hp) at the drawbar, linked to a three-speed transmission.

In 1928 revs were increased from 1000rpm to 1025rpm to give it more power.

The 10-20 stayed in production until 1939, although in its latter years it was less popular because of production of a new McCormick-Deering W-30.

The McCormick-Deering 10-20 TracTracTor was International Harvester's first production crawler and was basically a tracked conversion of the 10-20 wheel tractor.

According to Wikipedia, the crawler was steered by means of individual steering clutches and brakes for each track.

Another quality restored machine is this McCormick Deering crawler tractor.

Another quality restored machine is this McCormick Deering crawler tractor.

The external clutches were contained in dome-shaped structures in the driving compartment, structures which came to be nicknamed camel humps.

Steering levers protruding from the domes could be pivoted upward so the tractor could be driven from a standing position.

Other distinguishing features of the crawler were the larger rear than front sprocket, causing the top of the track to be slanted and the air cleaner placed in front of the radiator.

The 10-20 TracTracTor was superseded by the McCormick-Deering Model 20 TracTracTor which had smaller camel humps, straight fenders and completely revised under carriage.

A fully restored McCormick-Deering WD-6 is also in the catalogue.

The D designates it as a diesel engine-powered model as distinct from the WD6.

It was first built at the Farmall Works, Rock Island, Illinois, US, in 1940 and continued in production until 1952 when it was replaced by the McCormick Super WD6.

For full information and photos join the Facebook group Auction Sales Elders Bunbury, email admin@elders.com.au or phone 9726 5200.

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