Neil notches up 30 years

Neil notches up 30 years

Machinery
Meet Bronson Norrish, who is settling down to a career in manufacturing at Baker's Hill, with his father and company owner Neil, who is celebrating 30 years in the industry after switching from farming at Trayning

Meet Bronson Norrish, who is settling down to a career in manufacturing at Baker's Hill, with his father and company owner Neil, who is celebrating 30 years in the industry after switching from farming at Trayning

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Baker's Hill manufacturer Neil Norrish is celebrating 30 years in the industry this year with no hint of letting up.

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BAKER'S Hill manufacturer Neil Norrish is celebrating 30 years in the industry this year with no hint of letting up.

"I'll retire when they cart me out of here in a pine box," he told Torque last week.

"I just love the game and talking with people and figuring out ways to do things better for farmers.

"It's the challenge."

And as Darryl Kerrigan, the main character in the classic Australian film The Castle said, "it's also the vibe", which produces a trademark chuckle from Neil.

He erected a shingle in Trayning in 1987, Norrish Supplies, basically selling bearings and providing a mechanical service.

That morphed into the Norrish Service Group in 1989 when he started making GroMor harrows, following in the footsteps of Merredin manufacturer Laurie Phillips, who up until that stage, had been making Phoenix harrows.

"In 1996, Neil moved his operation to Baker's Hill where he started making field bins, chaser bins, hydraulic augers, seed and fertiliser bins as well as the harrows.

He has always held the view, honed from his farming days that equipment he built had to be of the best quality.

"If you build stuff well it'll last," he said.

"But I also have always looked for ways to make things so it's easier for farmers to operate.

"That's probably the big driver for me, and why I enjoy talking with farmers to solve problems."

Back to that pine box, Neil is happy to report his son Bronson is now on board and they have been talking about succession planning.

"Bronson is keen to sit in my desk and I'm happy he can carry on the business," Neil said.

"He has been with the company for the past two years and is a jack-of-all-trades, including welding and grinding and he will do well in this business."

For Bronson, it's a chance to settle down into a career he believes holds a lot of excitement.

"I've worked in the mines, on sheep stations on the Nullarbor and jackaroo'd up north and I'm happy to be back helping dad," he said.

"I remember I used to help him when I was five years old, so perhaps my destiny might have been set then."

Currently, Bronson's major focus is on marketing and web design and maintenance.

For us old timers, it's interesting to see the young generation stepping up with new technology and Bronson is ideally placed to 'communicate', armed with a smartphone and apps.

Just remember, though, while you're sending off another text, the sound of the human voice still carries a lot of weight.

It's call the 'people game' for a sound reason.

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