Harvest deliveries are trickling in

Harvest deliveries are trickling in

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Tenindewa farmer Glenn Thomas was checking out this paddock of Sceptre wheat last Thursday when Farm Weekly took this photo. By Friday the headers were in with Mr Thomas reporting yields of 1.5t/ha with protein of 13 per cent, screenings at 4pc and grain recording hectolitre weights around 80. By the afternoon yield had picked up to between 1.6t/ha and 1.9t/ha, delivering a positive start to the weekend. Mr Thomas finished canola last week ("a bit down on yield") with the bulk of his 8800ha program consisting mainly of wheat.

Tenindewa farmer Glenn Thomas was checking out this paddock of Sceptre wheat last Thursday when Farm Weekly took this photo. By Friday the headers were in with Mr Thomas reporting yields of 1.5t/ha with protein of 13 per cent, screenings at 4pc and grain recording hectolitre weights around 80. By the afternoon yield had picked up to between 1.6t/ha and 1.9t/ha, delivering a positive start to the weekend. Mr Thomas finished canola last week ("a bit down on yield") with the bulk of his 8800ha program consisting mainly of wheat.

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As the weather warms up, harvest deliveries are expected to ramp up in coming weeks, with more crops coming online.

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AS the weather warms up, harvest deliveries are expected to ramp up in coming weeks, with more crops coming online.

While it is early in the season, the CBH Group confirmed that it had received 15,700 tonnes to its receival points in the Geraldton zone, with 3700t delivered to Kwinana North sites, 200t in Kwinana South, 730t in Albany and 340t in Esperance.

More than half of deliveries received have been barley, with 20 per cent being wheat, while canola, oats and lupins are also in the system.

This comes after the latest NAB Rural Commodities Wrap forecasts a downgrade from its total Australian wheat crop estimate of 20 million tonnes last month to 15.5mt.

NAB agribusiness economist Phin Ziebell said overall the NAB Rural Commodities Index had fallen 2.9 per cent in September and the bank had revised down wheat production forecasts in key States.

"In Western Australia the late break was followed by good June rain, but spring was unkind and we predict a WA wheat crop in the order of 6.3 million tonnes," Mr Ziebell said.

"Victoria and South Australia should yield 3.5mt each and crops are being cut for hay in New South Wales, where ongoing drought conditions have put our forecast at 1.75mt."

The report shows resilience in livestock markets, with the National Trade Lamb Indicator (NTLI) sitting at about $8/kilogram and the Eastern Young Cattle Indicator (EYCI) remaining flat.

"The EYCI is tracking sideways, at just below $5/kg," Mr Ziebell said.

"Demand for quality finished stock continues to run hot, but we struggle to see much upside for cattle prices until climatic conditions improve.

"The NTLI figure is exceptional for this time of year and it's looking increasingly unlikely the lamb market will experience the traditional 'spring flush'.

"Containment feeding of lambs remains popular, but high input costs means the viability of this approach remains sensitive to lamb prices."

Farm input prices were moderately higher, reflecting a weak Australian dollar.

Domestic feed prices remain higher than international benchmarks, but are 15.6pc lower than this time last year.

"With a good deal of winter crop being cut for hay, domestic hay supply should be strong coming into summer," Mr Ziebell said.

"While the NAB weighted feed grain index remains at $310/t this month, few graziers would have access to anything near those prices delivered on farm," Mr Ziebell said.

In terms of seasonal outlook, the Bureau of Meteorology three-month outlook to January is below average in most areas, but closer to average in much of New South Wales.

"Northern and central western New South Wales continues to record root zone soil moisture levels in the lowest one per cent on record, so any improvement in seasonal outlook is very welcome," Mr Ziebell said.

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