Lights on Hill focus on trucks, tractors

Lights on Hill focus on trucks, tractors

Machinery
Farm Weekly took this picture of Rob Rutherford (left), Waroona and B & J Catalano director Clem Catalano, Brunswick, earlier this year at the annual Lights on the Hill day at Brunswick. The pair was talking about the history of this Mack Flintstone truck, which Rob restored. "I used to drive a Flintstone in my early days as a logger and I always loved them," Rob said. "About eight years ago I started chasing around for old wrecks and I got five to make this one."Three of them I got at Donnybrook and I paid 13 cartons of beer for them."It has got a new Mack 285 Cool Power motor (developing 213 kilowatts (285 horsepower) and I made the bonnets and mudguards, plus I painted it myself." Rob, who is a member of the Old Machinery Club of WA, said the Flintstone was licensed but in between shows was kept "rugged up" in a shed.

Farm Weekly took this picture of Rob Rutherford (left), Waroona and B & J Catalano director Clem Catalano, Brunswick, earlier this year at the annual Lights on the Hill day at Brunswick. The pair was talking about the history of this Mack Flintstone truck, which Rob restored. "I used to drive a Flintstone in my early days as a logger and I always loved them," Rob said. "About eight years ago I started chasing around for old wrecks and I got five to make this one."Three of them I got at Donnybrook and I paid 13 cartons of beer for them."It has got a new Mack 285 Cool Power motor (developing 213 kilowatts (285 horsepower) and I made the bonnets and mudguards, plus I painted it myself." Rob, who is a member of the Old Machinery Club of WA, said the Flintstone was licensed but in between shows was kept "rugged up" in a shed.

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The eight annual Vintage Tractor & Machinery Association of WA (Trachmach) Lights on the Hill vintage machinery day at Brunswick, will move up another notch next year.

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THE eight annual Vintage Tractor & Machinery Association of WA (Trachmach) Lights on the Hill vintage machinery day at Brunswick, will move up another notch next year.

Scheduled for Saturday, April 18, the theme will focus on celebrating 100 years of Mack trucks.

Effectively the event will be a truck and tractor show and organisers are planning to accommodate about a 100 vintage and new Mack trucks alongside the regular vintage tractors.

It could result in another attendance record which hit 4500 last year when about 100 vintage tractors were displayed, celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Chamberlain tractor.

According to Lights co-ordinator Robert Cook, there are many Mack truck enthusiasts in WA who have spent countless hours restoring old models.

"We're encouraging everybody with a restored Mack truck to display it at Lights and we're also expecting a few surprises involving new owners with an as-yet released new Mack 2020 model,'' Rob said.

According to Mack Trucks, the company was founded in 1900 by Jack and Gus Mack in Brooklyn, New York and was originally known as the Mack Brothers Company, producing its first successful motorised vehicle in 1900.

Mack Trucks earned their trademark nickname 'the Bulldog' in 1917, during the First World War, when the British government purchased the Mack AC model to supply its front lines with troops, food and equipment.

British soldiers dubbed the truck the Bulldog Mack.

Its pugnacious, blunt-nosed hood, coupled with its incredible durability, reminded the soldiers of the tenacious qualities of their country's mascot, the British Bulldog.

Australia's first experience with the famous Bulldog Mack was in 1919, when an AC Mack was specially ordered and delivered for use in the oil industry.

Many of the truck models produced in the 1920s were chain drive on the rear wheels.

In 1963, Mack Trucks Australia was founded and started building and adapting trucks to suit Australian conditions.

The company's factory in Wacol, Queensland, houses manufacturing and engineering facilities with about 450 people directly employed in the production process and about 50 dedicated engineers.

About 85 local suppliers deliver more than 3500 different components to the Wacol factory - many made in Australia.

This year's event will again be held on a hill-side, immediately south of the town and fronting South West Highway,

More information: Robert Cook 0428 637 207.

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