CWA ladies continue to cook up a storm

CWA ladies continue to cook up a storm

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Woodanilling CWA ladies Margaret Cook (left), Patricia Buick, Pauline Edgcumbe and Marj Winstanley do their share to ensure patrons are well fed during Wagin Woolorama.

Woodanilling CWA ladies Margaret Cook (left), Patricia Buick, Pauline Edgcumbe and Marj Winstanley do their share to ensure patrons are well fed during Wagin Woolorama.

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CWA is gearing for the mammoth task of feeding thousands of punters.

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IF you wanted a thousand lunches and many more cups of tea and coffee to get you over the weekend who would you call?

The Country Women's Association of, course.

It has been the CWA's role for more than 40 years to cater for the crowds during the two days of the Make Smoking History Wagin Woolorama and for the past 18 years it has fallen to Carol Rogers to co-ordinate the mammoth effort.

Ms Rogers starts organising a small army of 10 CWA branches in October, sending out a list of cakes and other baking she needs from each of them and every year they rally with workers to do their shifts.

They come from Lake King, Nyabing, Lake Grace, Darkan, Badgebup/Rockwell, Newdegate, Tambellup, Wagin, Woodanilling and Broomehill arriving at 7am on Friday morning at the CWA hall in town to start a two-hour session making sandwiches and salad rolls.

Each branch usually sends three or four volunteers and, along with plenty of local volunteers who pop in to ask if help is needed, they accomplish one of their biggest and most enjoyable fundraising efforts for the year.

During the course of the two days they will make up about 650 rounds of sandwiches and 350 salad rolls, as well as plating up countless cakes, slices and biscuits for morning and afternoon tea.

Ms Roger's motto is to keep it simple and fresh and who doesn't love a fresh meat and salad sandwich?

She does all the ordering locally and because the luncheon booth has only basic facilities, they need to hire a cool room and hope Nyabing lady Jo Addis will be there on the day.

As a stalwart in the operation Ms Addis rules where no one else likes to go - the kitchen sink - and she makes it light work for her helpers.

From an ethical and sustainability perspective, there are no paper plates and although sugary drinks are available, they are kept under the counter.

Behind the scenes Ms Rogers' husband Barry plays his role, ensuring everything is fetched and carried and in its place.

Worker rosters are drawn up with everyone doing a two-hour shift over the two days and at the end any left-over food is donated to the local food bank and the profits are shared equally between all the branches.

For Wagin the money helps pay administration fees to the State branch and donations are made to varying organisations, including the local fire brigade, ambulance, school, and senior citizen groups, as well as supporting State CWA projects.

Ms Rogers and her husband moved to Wagin from Kalgoorlie where she had gained some experience in catering and has loved the co-ordinator's role.

"It is just two day's work and it's all over and everyone goes away happy and has made a decent amount of money for their branch," Ms Rogers said.

The Wagin Golf Club also serves a bacon and eggs, coffee and toast breakfast from the luncheon booth for show patrons and exhibitors on Friday and Saturday morning.

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