Dry conditions put a halt on seeding

Dry conditions put a halt on seeding

Cropping News
Dust and sunrays in Perenjori. Photo by Ellie Morris.

Dust and sunrays in Perenjori. Photo by Ellie Morris.

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The Campbell's started seeding at the start of the month but had to stop last week as the ground was too dry.

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KAYNE Campbell farms with his family at Kalannie and if everything goes to plan, they will seed a total of 2400 hectares.

That amount includes 1700ha of wheat, 400ha of triticale and 300ha of barley which was already in the ground before news of potential Chinese tariffs came out.

The Campbell's started seeding at the start of the month but had to stop last week as the ground was too dry.

"There's certain paddocks we just can't get into because it's too hard on the gear and wears out the parts pretty quickly, plus we're battling for traction with the tractor when it's that dry," Mr Campbell said.

"We'll crank back up again after we get a decent rain, which is hopefully this weekend.

"We've probably got another two or three weeks after we start back up again, so hopefully we don't run too far into June."

The property received a fair bit of summer rain in February, however that is all in the subsoil - on the back of the five to 10 millimetres so far for May.

Mr Campbell said they were being cautious, not liking to seed the whole crop dry.

"We definitely hope for the best but prepare for the worst," he said.

"Hopefully the front that's predicted for Sunday and Monday brings a decent downfall with it and we can get things back on track again."

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