Driscoll's move to organic blueberries

Driscoll's markets "in conversion" blueberries at it moves to organic production

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READY: Driscoll's blueberry grower, Nico Mulder, Tumbarumba, NSW with some in-conversion blueberries.

READY: Driscoll's blueberry grower, Nico Mulder, Tumbarumba, NSW with some in-conversion blueberries.

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The large berry brand is making the most of an organic transition.

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BERRY variety brand Driscoll's is encouraging consumers to continue eating its berries even while its farms transition to organic production.

Driscoll's "in-conversion blueberries" have been grown by farmers adhering to organic principles but haven't yet been officially certified organic

The blueberries are farmed at the main farm in Tumbarumba, a little town in the Snowy Mountains, NSW by farmer Nico Mulder.

According to Driscoll's, it can take between 12 months and three years for the land to be cleared of prohibited substances.

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"We're working hard to make sure our soil fertility, plant nutrition and pest control adheres to the best organic farming principles and can't wait for the day that our blueberries can be classified as Certified Organic," the Driscoll's website said.

Driscoll's in-conversion blueberries are being sold through selected Woolworths and Coles stores across Australia and selected independent grocers.

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The story Driscoll's move to organic blueberries first appeared on Good Fruit & Vegetables.

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