Seasonal updates review local research

Seasonal updates review local research

Cropping News
 Badgingarra farmers John Scotney (left), Andrew Kenny and Graham White.

Badgingarra farmers John Scotney (left), Andrew Kenny and Graham White.

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Seasonal updates review West Midlands Group research

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SHARING knowledge and networking formed the basis the West Midlands Group's (WMG) Seasonal Updates recently.

More than 65 growers and industry representatives gathered at the Dandaragan Community Centre for the event, which featured speakers from across the ag sector presenting on topics from transitioning to a non-mulesing operation to the 2020 season National Variety Trial results and the top crops to look out for in the coming years.

CBH Group chief executive officer Jimmy Wilson gave an update and answered grower questions about how the co-operative's plans to navigate global market uncertainty in 2021, saying it will continue to "invest in the network, efficient and grower focused services, provide low-cost inputs for WA growers and develop markets for WA grain in Asia".

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development research scientist Chad Reynolds unpacked the results from a trial conducted at Lawson Grains operation Yanda, south west of Moora, which investigated the best combination of clay application rate, method of incorporation and repeated strategic deep tillage approach to optimise long-term crop production benefits.

"For this repellent deep sand spading has proven, over five seasons, to be the most effective and profitable amelioration method," Mr Reynolds said.

 Farmer Murray Grey, Yathroo and West Midland Group mixed farming systems officer Brianna Hindle.

Farmer Murray Grey, Yathroo and West Midland Group mixed farming systems officer Brianna Hindle.

"Repeat spading had significant yield benefit but longer-term assessment is needed to determine if the additional cost is warranted."

WMG mixed farming systems officer Brianna Hindle shared results from last year's Dandaragan and Coorow trials that investigated late season amelioration and pasture varieties.

"Mixing pasture varieties increased dry matter production, feed nutrition value and soil coverage at the Coorow trial site," Ms Hindle said.

"At both the Dandaragan and Coorow sites, ameliorating following the season break decreased the risk of erosion from major weather events."

Ms Hindle encouraged growers to consider the purpose of any pasture sown to determine whether an early winter feed or a spring feed source was required.

 Midlands Biosecurity Group co-ordinator Chris OCallaghan (left), with farmers Tim Hayes, Eganu and Ian Broad, Dandaragan.

Midlands Biosecurity Group co-ordinator Chris OCallaghan (left), with farmers Tim Hayes, Eganu and Ian Broad, Dandaragan.

Trial host growers Duncan Glasfurd, Dandaragan and Charles Wass, Coorow, answered questions about their take-away messages from the trials and if the results had an impact on their decisions for 2021 paddock planning.

Australian cricketer Brad Hogg was the final speaker for the day.

Originally from Williams, Mr Hogg shared hilarious anecdotes and inspiring takes on his career kept the crowd on their toes despite the long day.

Attendees had the opportunity to meet and chat with the cricketing legend at the annual Rabobank sundowner which closed the event.

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