Move to centralised sales in Tasmania is paying off

Move to centralised sales in Tasmania is paying off

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Manager Andrew Palmer and Mady Muirhead at the TLX yards.

Manager Andrew Palmer and Mady Muirhead at the TLX yards.

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The move to a centralised livestock selling centre has paid dividends for Tasmanian growers.

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The move to a centralised livestock selling centre has paid dividends for Tasmanian producers and buyers.

The Tasmania Livestock Exchange has recorded strong sales during its first six months of operation at Powranna even with COVID-19 border closures.

The TLX is looking to welcome back buyers from the mainland now restrictions have eased.

Powranna, near Launceston, was rebranded as the TLX and hosts weekly sales and a once-a-month multi-agent sale.

The move to Powranna follows the closure of saleyards at Killafaddy and Quoiba.

Nutrien Ag Solutions and Elders Livestock Agents both sell stock at the Powranna facility which provides Tasmanian growers a selling model similar to mainland livestock sales.

The TLX is part of Nutrien Ag Solutions' rebrand of the livestock sales industry in Tasmania.

TLX manager Andrew Palmer says the coronavirus pandemic caused minimal disruptions to regular sales at the TLX.

"Since our first sale in September last year, we have maintained strong competition and held good volumes of top-quality livestock," Mr Palmer said.

Mr Palmer says all sales at TLX have been well attended by Tasmanian farmers and buyers, and local Tasmanian representatives for interstate buyers.

"We are focused on delivering a premier sale yard experience to all livestock buyers, sellers and agents - in January we had one buyer purchase five truckloads of mutton (1800 head)."

Mr Palmer says since border restrictions have eased, they are now welcoming back regular buyers from the mainland.

"This is a single-point selling centre only 20 minutes from Launceston airport, so the facility is really well positioned for buyers travelling interstate," Mr Palmer says.

The TLX saw a larger yarding of 1813 lambs this week with a small yarding of 563 sheep.

"The cattle prices we experienced in the saleyards in February and March were phenomenal and have continued to be into our weaner sales with steer prices pushing up to 800 cents per kilogram," Mr Palmer said.

Restrictions caused by coronavirus over the past year has seen many livestock sales move online, but Mr Palmer doesn't think there will be a permanent shift away from traditional livestock auctions.

"It's great to see the industry embracing this new online approach to selling and buying livestock," he said.

"The use of technology and other digital solutions is saving time, money, and has added animal welfare and biosecurity benefits, but nothing can beat the smells and sounds of the saleyards - it's such a great atmosphere."

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The story Move to centralised sales in Tasmania is paying off first appeared on Farm Online.

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