Albany Show had something for everyone

Albany Show had something for everyone

Events
Albany Agricultural Show president Gary Wilson (right) was happy to see crowds streaming in to the grounds last Friday morning on day one of the two-day event.

Albany Agricultural Show president Gary Wilson (right) was happy to see crowds streaming in to the grounds last Friday morning on day one of the two-day event.

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One sad note was the death three days before the event of Bella Swainston, one of the show's long time contributors who had been running the creative craft and cooking section for more than 35 years.

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T was touted as an event offering something for everyone and Albany Agricultural Show certainly delivered on its promise at Centennial Park Showgrounds last Friday.

Show president Gary Wilson was thrilled to see crowds returning in their droves to the event.

"We had to give the show a miss last year due to COVID-19 restrictions and held a smaller Albany Fair event instead, but it was fantastic to be able to get back to having our usual displays and competitions again this year in our two-day show," Mr Wilson said.

"We changed the layout up a bit and had our horse events and State carriage driving championship on the main oval and our sheep and cattle competitions, fashion parade and bush poets were back in one central area and there was the big fireworks display on the Friday night.

"We went all out to encourage people back, with free entry for kids under 15, something that was carried over from last year's fair and just $10 entry for adults and that certainly put some smiles on faces and got feet on the ground."

Mr Wilson said another initiative had been to run a radio station for four days before, during and after the show.

"We got the licence from Canberra and contractors ran it with revenue from broadcast advertising shared between our two parties," Mr Wilson said.

"It was great for on-the-spot announcements, for promoting events taking place around the grounds, lost kid announcements and the like.

"People at the show could tune in to their FM radio and hear what was happening wherever they were.

"Our exhibitors seemed pretty happy and I heard of some good sales made throughout the two days, including one stallholder who brought down 17 beds and sold them all."

One sad note was the death three days before the event of Bella Swainston, one of the show's long time contributors who had been running the creative craft and cooking section for more than 35 years.

A note in the show office foyer paid tribute saying Ms Swainston "will be very sadly missed".

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