Harvey Beef young gun not looking back

Harvey Beef young gun not looking back


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Harvey Beef's young gun Kyle Hickman (left), who is the new Harvey Beef livestock planner with Dale Pemberton, Coles national livestock manager after they spoke during the Schools Challenge day of the Harvey Beef Gate 2 Plate Challenge mid-way inspection and field day

Harvey Beef's young gun Kyle Hickman (left), who is the new Harvey Beef livestock planner with Dale Pemberton, Coles national livestock manager after they spoke during the Schools Challenge day of the Harvey Beef Gate 2 Plate Challenge mid-way inspection and field day

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HARVEY Beef has its very own young gun.

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HARVEY Beef has its very own young gun.

Kyle Hickman is the new livestock planner at Harvey Beef after making an impression during a work experience placement and subsequent traineeship with the organisation.

He was asked to address students during the schools challenge portion of the Harvey Beef Gate 2 Plate Challenge held last week.

"Getting my foot in the door at Harvey Beef and in the agriculture industry is all thanks to my time at Harvey Ag," Kyle said.

"I always knew I had a passion for agriculture through primary and high school.

"It is easy for me to say choosing to go to ag school was the best possible decision I could have made, both career wise and personally.

"During my three years at Harvey ag, I went to an endless amount of livestock courses, trades courses, field days, excursions and anything else which came up.

"While studying for ATAR, I attained my certification 2 in automotive, engineering, furnishings, building construction, horticulture, wool handling and a certificate three in agriculture.

"I was head boy in year 12, vet dux and runner up in the training awards for vocational student of the year.

"To some of you that might sound like a fair bit and to others, hopefully it is very similar to what you're doing at the moment or aspire to be doing.

"In saying that, not everything you do at school can be measured by a list of qualifications.

"Meeting the people you meet at school, whether it is your teachers, technical officers, classmates, industry leaders or just about anyone else you meet involved in agriculture is one of the most rewarding and helpful things you can do to get your foot in the door of the agricultural business.

"The networks and relationships you'll make will be the greatest measure of success of your time at ag school, along with the endless amount of life skills and knowledge all ag schools provide their students with.

"While I was still at school, I completed a few weeks of work experience with Harvey Beef in the livestock department, where I helped out the livestock planner during the busy time of the year and was introduced to the way things work at the abattoir.

"Prior to finishing school I got in contact with both Wayne Shaw and Kim McDougall and eventually found myself sitting in Wayne's office discussing the exciting opportunity to be employed as a trainee at Harvey Beef.

"Two weeks after graduating school I started the traineeship working at the yards and over the next year and a half, I moved around the plant working in most departments from the slaughter floor, boning room, the farm, maintenance, security, chillers and by-products.

"This gave me a really good insight into the meat works process from start to finish, as well as a certificate two in meat processing which had led to my certificate four in leadership and a diploma in meat processing.

"A few weeks ago I was called up to the office and asked if I would like to take on the role of livestock planner which I was very quick to accept as I knew I wanted to get into that role right from the start.

"The role includes liaising with our livestock buyers and farmers to ensure sufficient cattle types and numbers for production, invoicing, analysing carcase and MSA data which helps determine suitable prices in the current market."

His career is one to watch.

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