Morris promotes its new Quantum Air Drill

Morris promotes its new Quantum Air Drill


Machinery
Morris owners at last week's Morris Input Control Technology (ICT) training day at McIntosh & Son, Wongan Hills branch were given a pleasant surprise with the attendance of two senior Morris executives. Morris Industries president Ben Voss (right), is pictured with Morris WA sales manager Eliot Jones (left), Morris Industries vice president (sales) Mike Dahlseide and McIntosh & Son Wongan Hills branch manager Aaron Sachse.

Morris owners at last week's Morris Input Control Technology (ICT) training day at McIntosh & Son, Wongan Hills branch were given a pleasant surprise with the attendance of two senior Morris executives. Morris Industries president Ben Voss (right), is pictured with Morris WA sales manager Eliot Jones (left), Morris Industries vice president (sales) Mike Dahlseide and McIntosh & Son Wongan Hills branch manager Aaron Sachse.

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Morris Industries president Ben Voss and vice president (sales) Mike Dahlseide spoke with more than 30 farmers at a Morris Input Control Technology (ICT), training day held by McIntosh & Son, Wongan Hills.

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MORRIS Industries executives visited WA last week to talk with dealer technical staff and owners of their latest seeding bar, the Morris Quantum Air Drill.

McIntosh Distribution's Max Herbert (national product support), left, talks with Morris sales manager WA Eliot Jones and McIntosh Distribution's Dylan Trindall (WA product support) before the start of last week's Morris training day at Wongan Hills.

McIntosh Distribution's Max Herbert (national product support), left, talks with Morris sales manager WA Eliot Jones and McIntosh Distribution's Dylan Trindall (WA product support) before the start of last week's Morris training day at Wongan Hills.

And in a surprise move, Morris Industries president Ben Voss and vice president (sales) Mike Dahlseide spoke with more than 30 farmers at a Morris Input Control Technology (ICT), training day held by McIntosh & Son, Wongan Hills.

Mr Voss said the company highly valued talking directly with dealer staff and customers.

"We regard Australia as a very significant market that helps guide our continuous significant investments in research and development," he said.

"Morris remains committed to serving the needs of farmers and it embraces continuous improvement, diversity and automation.

"This approach to business is how we are able to deliver on our commitments and offer exciting, state-of-the-art equipment like the Quantum drill."

The new air drill features unique interlocking frame technology that has made it 154 per cent stronger than previous drills, providing for improved durability, productivity and agronomic performance.

Other attributes include its massive tyres, allowing excellent flotation and deeper tilling; improved shank spacing options; three-metre controlled traffic capability with metric spacings and 5.4m transport width; 75pc less parts and 60pc less weldments; a stronger front and rear hitch design; and an active hydraulic system with ability to control Morris auto-lift and auto-pack control.

According to national distributor McIntosh Distribution's Eliot Jones, the Quantum has been in high demand for the 2019 season, with strong sales recorded.

He said further demonstrations of the drill this year would be carried out in most major cropping areas to give growers extra opportunities to view the technology and assess its strength and performance.

"Every grower in WA will be able to attend a demonstration within close distance.''

The ICT training day was specifically aimed at new ICT owners to provide them with a 'refresher course' on the technology and the opportunity to ask questions of technical staff.

Sectional control has become a buzzword in WA agriculture over the past two to three years with growing evidence of cost input savings.

And it has led to a rapid adoption, particularly by owners of Morris seeding rigs.

Owner comments about ICT - another name for section control - have praised the system and its ability to reduce input costs, with owners claiming overlap estimates of between six and 12.5pc.

The Morris ICT is designed to eliminate overlap by stopping product flow over the sections that are not required.

The ICT works via GPS and a Topcon X35 controller with the Morris carts, using the gear drive system for the metering wheels to quickly engage or disengage, allowing instantaneous shut-off.

It runs individual metering wheels that can stop product immediately, however, the system remains primed with product and as soon as it re-engages, it is back in the air stream.

The Topcon X35 also allows users to manage and control applications via tablets and smart phones.

The app and Bluetooth connectivity provides a mirrored view of the in-cab monitor, allowing calibration of the air cart without having to return to the cab to enter data.

According to Mr Jones, there had been continued increase in the uptake of ICT, with growers seeking the input efficiencies that can be achieved with sectional control.

"With the option of 'Xtend' on the Topcon X35 controller, growers also now have the ability to calibrate down at the air cart on the ground via WiFi using their tablet or smartphone," he said.

"They can also test the system by turning sections on or off from the tablet or smartphone.''

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